8.30.2012

R4CE & G3ND3R

A cute British boy took this photo of me in the subway and gave me the address for his tumblr (check it out HERE for more nocturnal queerness) over a month ago.  Turned out he was in nyc interning for Jeremy Kost, a photog who primarily shoots drag queens.

Coincidentally, I also just got a comment on an older post that is extremely relevant to this photo.  Read below:

Hey, this (your wearing of braids/durags) is cultural appropriation. Please stop.  It's especially offensive since you live in a neighborhood that's being rapidly gentrified by white people; the Dominicans who lived there for decades (as it was the only place they could afford) are being pushed out into the Bronx.  http://www.racialicious.com/2008/09/18/cultural-appropriation-homage-or-insult/

It's not my place to say what is or isn't right, but I will say that the way I choose to dress or do my hair comes from a place of love.  I'm more curious what you think - not that it's going to affect my future hair style decisions, to be completely honest - but because it's a valid topic and something people should think about.  And while I'm on the topic of race, I should address gender as well since I got another comment on here that I'm sure a lot of gender queers and drag queens out there have received...

Glad to see you back - as yourself. Drag is the worse of escape-ism. You end up turning into a self-centered, back-stabbing bitch-queen. You're young, seriously handsome, tons of talent .... get yourself a sensible b.f. and get on with your life.

And my response:

I'm always myself whether I'm wearing pantyhose, lipstick, stripper heels, or more traditionally male attire. There is no single me or you - there is an infinite spectrum of identity that is limited only by our desire to change and adapt. And it's funny because it's so rare that I am even remotely heteronormative so I'm honestly shocked anyone would react to my drag in that way.

Let me know what you think.

vintage helmut lang mesh shirt, garo sparo leather corset


4 comments:

  1. i say stop bitching about your comments and just moderate or delete your 'blog'. its the internet dude. relax your muscles.

    that hair comment was stupid, dont even think twice about it. its hair. its fashion. fuck em.

    and the drag thingy, well, i do have to say, i originally began following your 'blog' to see what you were up to creatively.

    but then you stopped.

    so i say maybe you should leave all your typical blogger shots for something dumb like instagram or something and instead perhaps 'blog' more about your actual creative work.

    then maybe you'll get the respect you're desiring. either way, at least it'll be based on what you DO and not what you WEAR.

    no hard feelings.

    love you, mean it. XOXO

    ReplyDelete
  2. agreed.

    you've completely given up your creative ventures to strut around in make-up. like it or not, drag queens are about as artistic as clowns. putting on an outfit to go to a party is not a form of high artistic expression, regardless of how much creative energy goes into your eye makeup and wig selection.

    this isn't an attack. it's a defense of your creativity, which you are allowing to atrophy.

    ReplyDelete
  3. that hair comment was stupid as hell. if you aren't allowed to be white and have braids, then people with braids shouldn't be allowed to wear plaid or use chopsticks.

    EVERYTHING IS APPROPRIATED. to isolate a culture only to people of that culture is idiotic and ACTUALLY racist.

    ReplyDelete
  4. One of my friend's responded to this, and I definitely agree with what she said:

    It's messed up that, for them [African Americans/Latinos], wearing braids and durags is synonymous with being "ghetto, uneducated, unsophisticated, criminal, dangerous, etc" but when a white person wears it all those adjectives don't apply. You're not truly seen as a threat, you're just suddenly "cool and stylish" or "weird", depending on the crowd. White people typically have negative opinions of black hair styling - unless they make it straight - and have brainwashed society's minds to see it as not right, but then they go right around and take it for themselves and deem it appropriate.

    But obviously I don't feel that is off limits so long as you approach it with respect.

    ReplyDelete

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